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CASE STUDY: How Video Interpreting Is Encouraging Limited-English Speakers To Turn Out On Election Day

Posted by Frank Masin on October 14, 2018

The elections office in Potter County, Texas, knew they had a problem after the 2016 Presidential election.

“We know that we have voters who are citizens (who are) eligible to vote and registered to vote, but if they don’t understand the language they may not actually come to vote,” Potter County Elections Administrator Melynn Huntley said in this recent video from KFDA News Channel 10 in Amarillo. “(After 2016) we realized we had a gap, particularly with American Sign Language and Somali.”

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'It Was Like a Miracle': A Video-Interpreting Success Story

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on September 24, 2018

Alex Gonzalez is a registered nurse in the oncology unit at Salinas Valley Memorial Health System. SVMH is a public hospital that provides quality health services to patients of all ages throughout Monterey County, an agricultural hub where a quarter of the overall population are non-citizens and more than 40 percent are native Spanish speakers.

It’s no wonder that when Gonzalez was trained on LanguageLine InSight, a video-interpreting solution that delivers on-demand access to professional linguists in 36 languages at the touch of a button, he thought the technology was heaven-sent.

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Why Pharmacies Need Language Access

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on September 18, 2018

Like physicians, pharmacies play an important role in empowering patients to take charge of their health

Unfortunately, language barriers often make it more difficult for non-English-speaking customers to ask important questions about their medication, take it as directed, and be aware of potential side effects.

As pharmacies serve increasingly diverse populations, language access is becoming more important than ever.

The Center for Immigration Studies reports that one in five Americans (65 million people) speaks a language other than English at home. Just over of 40 percent of these individuals is considered Limited English Proficient (LEP), meaning they speak English “less than very well” and are entitled to assistance. This LEP group constitutes about nine percent of the total U.S. population.

Language barriers can pose serious health risks to LEP customers. Research has shown that those with little knowledge of English often do not have a good understanding of their medication instructions.

Here are a few ways language access can help pharmacists empower their customers.

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Emergency Management Plans Should Incorporate Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Citizens

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on September 11, 2018

The imminent landfall of Hurricane Florence tells us that we are in the midst of a time of year that has become known as “hurricane season.” Sadly, it is also a period when we are reminded that the needs of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing are sometimes minimized and even forgotten during an emergency.

Approximately 35 million Americans are hearing impaired. It has been well documented that training designed to help communicate with this community during a disaster is rare, and frequently lacks standardization or integration into a formal emergency management plan.

All too often, crucial information is delivered infrequently, late, and is often missing critical facts – if it is delivered at all. These dangerous communication gaps leave the Deaf and Hard of Hearing with an incomplete understanding of what is happening, when it will happen, and what steps they are expected to take.

What can your community do to better communicate with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing when faced with an emergency?

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CASE STUDY: Rural Colorado Medical Center Uses Grant Funds to Purchase Interpreter on Wheels

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on May 9, 2018

Yampa Valley Medical Center (YVMC) in Steamboat Springs, CO, is a 39-bed acute-care hospital that provides sophisticated medical services to more than 51,000 outpatients annually. Nestled in the Rocky Mountains, the region is a popular vacation destination, which adds to the challenge of serving the rural area’s diverse language needs.

“We have 16 different languages used in 2017 at the hospital,” said Erica Gallagher, manager of language services at Yampa Valley Medical Center. “Our highest frequency languages are Spanish, Vietnamese, and Mandarin.

“When you first encounter someone that speaks a language other than the one you speak, you may feel like you can communicate decently, and that’s OK. But the more you have experience with it, you come to realize that, even if one word is misinterpreted, the outcome could be fatal or at the very least, have really negative consequences for the patient.”

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Measuring the ROI of Language Services in Health Care

Posted by Matthew Riley on December 1, 2017

A Somali man rushes into the emergency room with his young son, who has fallen from the balcony of their second-story apartment. Although the boy has no visible injuries, his father is concerned he may have a concussion and internal bleeding. He tries frantically to communicate with emergency room personnel using gestures and the few English phrases he has learned since moving to the United States six months before.

The triage nurse quickly places a video call to a Somali interpreter, who can relay the man’s concerns to her. Within minutes, the boy undergoes a CAT scan and receives appropriate treatment and monitoring. He is able to return home with his father later that evening.

Without video remote interpreting, this scenario could have played out much differently. While other industries demand to see a return on investment in hard dollars, the ROI of language services in health care is often measured by the absence of something.

Here are seven ways healthcare professionals measure the impact of their investment in language services.

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Multicultural ‘Super’ Consumers Are Buying: Are You Selling?

Posted by Bob Gallagher on November 29, 2017

“Super consumers” are the superheroes of retail. Both emotionally and economically engaged with brands and products, they are the top 10 percent of households that represent at least 30 percent of sales, 40 percent of growth and 50 percent of profit in any given category. Any retailer not connecting with these consumers’ passions and enthusiasm may face struggles.

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VIDEO: Earliest Adopter of Video Remote Interpreting Reports Significant Improvements

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on November 27, 2017

We all know that doctors sometimes have difficulty conveying medical terminology to patients. Imagine how insurmountable that challenge must feel when doctor and patient literally speak different languages.

This challenge is particularly acute in California’s Monterey County, an agricultural region known as “the Salad Bowl of the World” where nearly half of the 433,000 residents live in households in which a language other than English is spoken at home.  Of the county’s estimated 177,000 Spanish speakers, 56% are considered limited English proficient (LEP), meaning they speak English less than “very well.” Nationwide, only two regions – Miami-Dade (63.7 percent) and the Bronx (46.5 percent) – have a larger percentage of Spanish speakers than Monterey County (45.8 percent).

The area’s linguistic makeup presents an unusually large challenge for Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula (CHOMP), which is tasked with providing LEPs – as well as deaf and hard-of-hearing patients - meaningful access to their services.

WATCH THE VIDEO: InSight Breaks Language Barrier for Central Coast Patients

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When to Work with an Onsite Interpreter

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on November 20, 2017

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Free Webinar: Onsite & Video Remote Interpreting - How to Choose the Appropriate Modality

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on November 8, 2017

To use an onsite interpreter or not to use an onsite interpreter?

This is a frequent question in healthcare settings when tending to patients who are limited English proficient (LEP), deaf, or hard-of-hearing. The advent of over-the-phone interpreting (OPI) and video remote interpreting (VRI) has given healthcare providers multiple options when it comes to providing these patients with the language access to which they are entitled.

These providers are left wondering: Do we still need to work with onsite interpreters? The answer is an unequivocal “yes.”

In what instances are onsite interpreters still recommended? This question will be addressed in full during our upcoming webinar, “Onsite and Video Remote Interpreting: Choosing the Appropriate Modality,” which will take place Thursday, Nov. 16, at 2 p.m. ET.  

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