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Blog

A Mile in Their Shoes

Posted by Patti Geye on August 26, 2016

When deciding which Netflix movie to watch, or fall asleep to in front of the TV, I chose one that seemed fairly entertaining. I settled into my recliner and the movie began. Much to my surprise, it was in Italian with English subtitles. Not speaking Italian, I depend on reading the dialog. I’m pretty good with reading the captions and watching, so ok. About ten minutes in I wasn’t all that impressed. It seemed like they were saying a lot more, with much emotion, but the subtitles were short and fairly impassive. It was an Italian movie, so it was full of feeling. But I just wasn’t “feeling” it.

What was I missing?

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Disruptive Innovation: Change is Scary

Posted by Suzanne Franks on August 17, 2016

Finally, I am binge-watching the last season of the delightful period drama Downton Abbey. As I’ve watched each episode, I am amused with the myriad of “new disruptive innovations” featured in the early 1900s’ drama and the characters’ reactions to them.

There were no less than seven innovations from electricity, to the bicycle, the typewriter, a sewing machine, the telephone, and an automobile featured. Each and every time the new-fangled novelty was met with skepticism. Actually, they were more than skeptical, they were afraid. The innovations challenged their comfort-zone and forced the characters to do things differently or simply be left behind. As Mrs. Patmore, the downstairs cook, exclaimed when she first heard the ringing of the telephone, “Oh my Lord, listen to that! It’s like the cry of the banshee! I wouldn’t touch that thing with a ten foot pole!” Yet with each subsequent episode the disruptive innovation became a way of life. Why? Each new device made their lives easier, more productive and efficient, and more enjoyable. It not only helped make their personal lives easier, it assisted in meeting the demands of the Manor.

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Effective Language Access: The Challenge for Educators

Posted by Greg Holt on August 10, 2016

With the advent of legislation like the Every Student Succeeds Act, No Child Left Behind, and other regulations that strengthen the involvement of parents in their children’s education, school districts have a growing need for successful language access programs.

At the core of the need for language solutions is the principle of ensuring meaningful access to educational programs. Federal legislation, like Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, prohibits discrimination on the basis of national origin, which today includes language. Other statutes touching on equal opportunity for children (and their parents) to participate in the educational process include the Equal Educational Opportunity Act, Title III of No Child Left Behind Act, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Mandates to provide equal access to the benefits of public education are a common theme.

The main driver for the growth of language services in schools is the Limited English Proficient (LEP) population around the country. In the United States, where 1 in 5 individuals now speak a language other than English at home, schools encounter significant language barriers. English language learners (ELL) comprised 9.3% (or 4.5 million students) in 2013-2014. In California that number reached 22.7%! These statistics don’t account for LEP parents. Communicating with parents in their preferred language is critical to their full understanding and participation in their children’s education. 

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Need Help Complying with ACA’s Final Rule?

Posted by Suzy duMont-Perez on July 27, 2016

As a health care provider ensuring access to qualified interpreters for the Limited English Proficient (LEP) and the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing is the right thing to do. Under Section 1557, it is now also the law. 

As of July 18, 2016 health care entities that receive federal funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), HHS-administered programs, and Health Insurance Marketplaces and participating plans are obligated to comply with sweeping new federal language access requirements. These new standards were included in the final rule implementing Section 1557, the nondiscrimination provision of the Affordable Care Act.

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Technology's Impact on Interpretation Services

Posted by Scott W. Klein, CEO, LanguageLine Solutions on July 14, 2016

These are exciting times at LanguageLine Solutions! The ability to change the way we do business has been influenced by the incredible speed of technological advancement. New integrated technologies are able to address the growing needs of our clients to communicate with the Limited English Proficient (LEP) and Deaf and Hard of Hearing communities they serve.

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Understanding Cultural and Traditional Practices Improves Patient Care

Posted by Suzy duMont-Perez on June 16, 2016

Culture is an integral part of our make-up, influencing who we are and how we communicate. According to the U. S. Census, the foreign-born population in 2014 was at 42.3M and is expected to grow to 47.9M by 2020. As our population continues to become more ethnically and culturally diverse, it is essential that healthcare professionals and others working with diverse populations possess cultural awareness sensitivities and the ability have access to cross cultural communication. Culturally aware healthcare organizations are sensitive to the use of traditional treatment practices of diverse populations.

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OnSite Interpreters Handle Difficult Health Care Situations

Posted by Kasia Hallman on May 20, 2016

Every interpreting experience is important and has unique requirements and requests. To ensure the very best outcomes, it is imperative that every session is treated with the utmost respect and accuracy. Professional onsite interpreters are mentored to handle situations including sensitive conversations when interpreting between you and your limited English speaking, and Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing patients.

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Medical Translation: Is Translation of Vital Documents Enough?

Posted by Cory Markert on May 11, 2016

Healthcare providers know that understanding written medical information is difficult for most patients. And they also know the difficulties Limited English Proficient (LEP) patients encounter in trying to comprehend the context when they can’t read the language of the document. It is intimidating and frightening. When the documents are in the language of the patient, compliance with treatment, satisfaction with the experience, and trust dramatically increases.

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5 Reasons Health Care Providers Need Medical Interpreters

Posted by Suzy duMont-Perez on April 27, 2016

As the United States becomes more and more diverse, so do the languages we speak. Today, more than 25 million Americans speak English “less than very well,” according to the U.S. Census Bureau. This effect is felt especially in healthcare, where communication and language comprehension can directly affect patient safety and satisfaction—not to mention the associated risks and costs involved. In fact, research indicates that limited English proficient (LEP) patients are less health-literate, more at risk for drug complications, and more likely to be misunderstood by their physicians. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) suggests that nearly 9% of the U.S. population is at risk for an adverse event because of language barriers.

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How Can a Professional Business Interpreter Make Your Job Easier?

Posted by Greg Holt on April 14, 2016

The skills of a professional business interpreter go far beyond relaying the meaning of words. Regardless of the field you’re in, an experienced interpreter enables you to bridge language and cultural gaps when communicating with people who do not share your mother tongue. That’s critical to doing your job and can make it a lot easier.

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