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Please Check In Animals & Alcoholics: 9 Signs Lost in Translation

Posted by Scott Brown on January 13, 2017

Sometimes signs that are meant to direct or clarify only create more confusion. Others make us laugh; still others make us cringe.

The LanguageLine team loves to travel, so we have seen our fair share of perplexing signs.

Here are nine travel-related signs that apparently got lost in translation.

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5 Concerns Hospitals Have About Video Remote Interpreting

Posted by Suzanne Franks on January 11, 2017

In a hospital setting, access to quality on-demand interpreting can be a matter of life and death. Interpreters must be able to relay information to physicians quickly and accurately under intense pressure while remaining calm and reassuring.

Many hospitals use on-site interpreters, but this isn’t always practical or cost-effective, particularly when a patient needs an interpreter immediately, or the patient speaks a language that is less common. In these scenarios, video remote interpreting can be a lifeline. More hospitals are using video technology to supplement on-site interpreting.

Here are five common concerns hospitals have as they contemplate video remote interpreting.

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How to Spot High-Quality Language Interpreters

Posted by Simon Yoxon-Grant on January 6, 2017

Never underestimate the power of a quality language interpreter.

Interpreters bring clarity in the midst of confusion. They diffuse tense situations and even help medical professionals save lives.

The language interpreters your organization uses become your representatives. Ensuring the quality of your interpreters is essential, whether you are training in-house staff or hiring a provider. How can you be sure that you are using a high-quality language interpreter who will represent you well?

We recommend you look for these six indicators:

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5 Elements of an Effective Language Access Plan

Posted by Jorge Ungo on January 4, 2017

At one time, having a language access plan was considered progressive and proactive. Now, it is increasingly becoming a standard for quality care and service.

For instance, health care entities that receive federal funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, HHS-administered programs, and Health Insurance Marketplaces are now required to comply with new federal language access requirements outlined in Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act.

Having a written language access plan brings clarity to these requirements. It articulates unambiguously which members of your staff are responsible for meeting them. A written plan also shows auditors that your organization takes language access seriously so you can continue to maximize your federal funding.

A language access plan should address these five elements.

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Should You Use Phone, Onsite, or Video Remote Interpreting?

Posted by Suzanne Franks on December 23, 2016

Having more options than at any other time in history is generally a good thing, but the “paradox of choice” has a tendency to paralyze us. (As the famous jam study illustrated, consumers were much more likely to buy a jar of jam when they saw only six options, compared to 24.)

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Three Good Reasons Not to Skimp on Language Services

Posted by Suzanne Franks on December 21, 2016

Bargains can sometimes be deceptive.

You were thrilled to take home a pre-lit Christmas tree you thought was a steal at 80 percent off—until you discovered only 20 percent of it actually lit up.

Or you bought a friend’s used car that seemed perfect for your 16-year-old daughter, only to spend twice the list price on repairs in the first two months.

Buyer’s remorse can also happen when it comes to shopping for language services—and sometimes the results are much worse.

Here are three costly consequences of choosing the lowest-cost language service provider without regard for quality.

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Who Should Lead the Implementation of Your Language Access Plan?

Posted by Jorge Ungo on December 16, 2016

 

Some organizations are just beginning to acknowledge the need for language access services in response to legislation like the Affordable Care Act’s Section 1557, and they don’t know where to start.

Providing meaningful language access to limited English proficiency populations and individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing is not only the right thing to do - it’s required by law.

Someone needs to take ownership of and implement your organization’s language access plan. If you aren’t sure who that "someone" should be, here are a few questions to help you decide.

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Choosing a Language Services Provider? Consider These 4 Factors

Posted by Patti Geye on December 14, 2016

Language access is more than an amenity; it’s become a necessity for any organization that works closely with the public. Nowadays they need to meet people where they are, and in the language they speak.

Consider these facts:

  • More than 25 million people living in the United States have limited English proficiency, meaning they identify as speaking English "less than well," according to the most recent U.S. Census data.
  • At least 350 languages are spoken in U.S. homes, according to census data.
  • An estimated 37 million American adults report some trouble hearing, according to the National Institutes of Health.

The right language services provider can mean the difference between closing the language gap for your customers and clients, or adding to their confusion and frustration. There are thousands of providers, so how can you be sure your organization selects the right one?

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We Are Thankful in All Languages

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on November 23, 2016

'Tis the season for giving thanks. We would like to take a moment to share our gratitude for the all the essential components that comprise LanguageLine.

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LanguageLine’s Newest “Language” — Plain English

Posted by Charlene Haykel on October 27, 2016


LanguageLine Solutions has added a “new language” to the more than 240 we already offer our clients. The language is English, with a twist. It’s plain English and it helps you communicate in terms that your reader will readily understand. The benefits include streamlined documents, higher customer satisfaction, lower costs, compliance with regulations, and communications that are better structured for clear translation outcomes. 

Example:
  • Before:
    Your current dividend of $288.55 has purchased paid-up additional insurance in the face amount of $1,249.57. Your total paid-up additional insurance is $2,749.57.

  • After:
    We have bought more life insurance with your dividend: $1,249.57 since your last bill and $2,749.57 since you opened your account.

This example reflects an actual bill that was sent to thousands of clients across the American heartland. Sure, it’s in English but what kind of English? The 23 original words would confound the most fluent native speaker. Written in a more concise, easier to understand format through our new product, LanguageLine® Clarity℠, the revised information has only two fewer words. But they are straight-forward, real words, not acronyms or jargon, and they pack 100% more meaning for the life insurance customer receiving her bill. 



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