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How to Avoid Seven Common Localization Mistakes

Posted by Scott Ludwigsen on April 17, 2019

If your organization has decided to undertake a localization project, you’ve already taken an important step toward expanding your reach to a global audience.

But, as we all know, the best-laid plans can come undone in the execution. Taking a few steps ahead of time to prepare your content to be translated and localized can help you avoid frustrating delays or costly oversights.

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LINER NOTES: The Hispanic Vote Will Be Critical in 2020. So Why Are Candidates Fumbling Spanish Translation?

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on April 15, 2019

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Starting a Localization Project? 15 Questions to Answer Before You Begin

Posted by Cory Markert on April 12, 2019

Arriving at a website that wasn’t intended for you can feel a lot like traveling to a foreign country you hadn’t planned to visit.

You don’t recognize the currency or know the exchange rate. You struggle to read the signs. You scan the landscape for something familiar, but nothing seems to be where you expect it to be.

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LINER NOTES: How Shows Like Game of Thrones and Star Trek Create New Languages

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on April 9, 2019

Each week, LanguageLine selects five stories about language and culture that we think readers will find intriguing. Here is this week’s “Liner Notes”:

Time was, if you were creating a fantasy or sci-fi world in film or TV, you could simply make up some lines using sounds that English speakers didn’t hear much and get away with few people noticing or caring.

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New eBook: Preparing for Localization

Posted by Scott Ludwigsen on April 5, 2019

The internet has opened the door to any company that wants to go global.

With one click, a consumer can now buy shoes from Paris while lying in bed in Beijing or sitting in a Buenos Aires coffee shop. 

The world is digitally enabled and buying online. Almost 70 percent of European internet users made at least one purchase in 2018, with 36 percent of those users buying goods and services from countries besides their own. Meanwhile, the Asian e-commerce market is set to reach $1.4 trillion in the near future.  

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LINER NOTES: Should Students Use Netflix to Learn a Foreign Language?

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on March 6, 2019

Each week, LanguageLine selects five stories about language and culture that we think readers will find interesting, as they could have far-reaching implications.

We wrote earlier this week about how America’s failure to fund language education is creating a national security crisis. Reports suggest that fewer school-age kids in English-speaking countries are picking up a second or foreign language. This is an alarming trend as it makes students less competitive, in addition to leaving them with a smaller arsenal of the skills needed to thrive in an increasingly globalized and multicultural world.

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America’s Failure to Fund Language Education Is Creating a Crisis

Posted by Suzanne Franks on March 4, 2019

If we care about national security, language education is a "need to have," not a "nice to have."

It was recently reported that colleges in the United States shuttered a staggering 651 language programs in a recent three-year period, while only 7 percent of U.S. college students are currently enrolled in a language course. This news did not create the shockwaves it should have, as America’s failure to invest in language learning has led to a crisis that could have implications for generations to come.

The magnitude of this predicament was apparent as we gathered in Washington, D.C., several weeks ago for Language Advocacy Day, an annual event on Capitol Hill produced by the Joint National Committee for Languages (JNCL) that is aimed at garnering more federal support for language education. Talking with lawmakers, educators, and other language professionals, it was impossible to miss the fact that absent a much greater investment in language education, America’s national security and ability to compete in a global marketplace will be put at great risk. Simply put: to remain competitive and safe, the U.S. needs more world-language learners – and accomplishing this will require funding.

Language Advocacy Day attendees learned that it took several years for the full impact of the 2008 recession to be felt by foreign-language programs. Higher education lost just one foreign-language program from 2009 to 2013. From 2013 to 2016, it lost 651.

“I'm really concerned that in 2020 (when the study is conducted again), that number is going to be higher," said Dennis Looney, director of programs at the Modern Language Association.

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LINER NOTES: This 2-Year-Old Deaf Girl’s Neighborhood is Learning American Sign Language

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on February 25, 2019

Each week, LanguageLine selects five stories about language and culture that we think readers will find interesting, as they could have far-reaching implications.

Two-year-old Samantha Savitz is deaf, but she loves to talk to anyone who knows sign language. Her desire for engagement has been painfully obvious to everyone in the neighborhood.  Whenever they see her on a walk or in her yard — and Sam tries to be neighborly — they find themselves at frustrating loss for words.

On their own, Sam's neighbors got together, hired an instructor, and are now fully immersed in an American Sign Language class. 

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Best Practices for Healthcare Translations

Posted by Cory Markert on February 19, 2019

The importance of providing translated materials to multicultural patients cannot be overemphasized.

Unfortunately, many healthcare organizations are not sure how to expand their language access programs to include healthcare translation services.

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LINER NOTES: Japan Embraces Video Interpreting for Retail, Banks

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on February 18, 2019

We have been talking a lot lately about the massive potential for adding video interpretation to branch offices and brick-and-mortar retail locations. (In fact, we wrote an ebook on how banks can best use video interpreting.) It seems that Japan is taking heed of the many benefits video remote interpreting (VRI) can deliver.

In light of an increasing number of foreign customers, Japanese supermarket giant Aeon Co. has launched a real-time video interpreting service. Shop clerks at about 550 Aeon stores now carry smartphones or tablet devices that can access interpreters through video chat software similar to Facetime or Skype.

Meanwhile, Japan’s MUFG Bank has started an over-the-counter service for hearing-impaired customers that involves sign language-fluent interpreters on tablet devices. The assistance is the first of its kind at a Japanese bank. The service is available at most outlets, and it acts as an intermediary between a hearing-impaired customers and bank staff at the counter.

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