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What 2017 Taught Insurance Companies About the Need for Language Services

Posted by Greg Marshall on December 13, 2017

 

 

For tens of thousands of people, 2017 was a year of devastation.

First it was floods: residents in Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico, and other southern states faced catastrophic damage. Hurricane Harvey alone claimed at least 48 lives and caused an estimated $190 billion in damage. Then it was fire. Wildfires in Northern and Southern California forced thousands of residents to evacuate their homes as the governor twice declared a state of emergency.

When you factor in severe storms, cyclones, and other weather-related events, there were 15 that claimed more than 320 lives as of October. Each disaster cost $1 billion or more. Many of those affected were limited English proficient, deaf, or hard-of-hearing and required language services.Insurance companies know disaster is inevitable.

Having a language service provider on hand is a simple step they can take to ensure they are prepared to assist their policyholders and provide a great customer experience, regardless of language need.

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Interpreter and Translator are America's Top Emerging Careers

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on December 6, 2017

Interpreters and translators top the national list of emerging careers for bachelor’s degree holders, according to a new study.

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Why Onsite Interpreters Charge a Two-Hour Minimum

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on November 21, 2017

When Alice went down the rabbit hole and into Wonderland in the children’s fable, all perception was distorted. Large things appeared small, and vice versa.

A similar perception issue tends to affect well-meaning health care providers when they schedule an onsite interpreter. An appointment they envision will take just a short time is very often in reality a much bigger commitment than anticipated.

The question of an onsite interpreter’s two-hour minimum is a reasonable one to ask. Clients often inquire why they must pay for two hours when they feel they only need the interpreter for 30 minutes. Why can’t the health care provider simply pay onsite interpreters for the time they work?

Though it often catches clients by surprise, the two-hour minimum is fairly standard. First and foremost, the practice exists to protect the client from unforeseen costs, as well as to support the patient experience.

Clients typically project an appointment will take 20-30 minutes; however, after checking into a clinic, sitting in the waiting room, visiting with the physician, and checking out, most appointments average around 85 minutes.

Consider the following:

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When to Work with an Onsite Interpreter

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on November 20, 2017

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Five Takeaways from California's Groundbreaking Language-Access Law

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on November 14, 2017

More than 40 percent of California residents speak a language other than English. It is also a state in which there is a significant mismatch between the second languages spoken by its physicians and the primary languages spoken by its patients.

Nearly 7 million California residents are considered limited English proficient (LEP), meaning they speak English “less than very well.” At last count, nearly a quarter of the nation’s total LEP population lived in this one state. In an effort to increase access to language services for these individuals, Governor Jerry Brown recently approved California Senate Bill No. 223 Chapter 771.

Here are five significant aspects of the law and their significance to healthcare organizations throughout the nation:

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How Marketers Are Using Language to Attract Multicultural Consumers

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on October 19, 2017

Driven by population growth and expanding buying power, multicultural consumers are transforming the ways marketers and advertisers use culture to connect with increasingly diverse consumer markets.  For businesses, this is why investments made now in language will pay off for decades to come.

Between 1990 and 2014, according to Nielsen, multicultural buying power increased from $661 billion to $3.4 trillion, and it will only continue to grow. Because the median age of the multicultural population is lower and the life expectancy longer than those of non-Hispanic whites, these consumers have significantly more effective years of buying power ahead of them.

We’ve already talked about why language services are critical to the future of retail, as well as how language services in retail can create the sort of personalized, experiential shopping environment that multicultural consumers are seeking these days.

 But no matter how wonderful your store’s shopping experience and customer service are, they’re only effective once someone is in the store. Let’s talk about how retailers are using language to market to multicultural consumers.

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Beyoncé Is Back With Bilingual Remix - and Fundraising for Relief Efforts

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on September 29, 2017

After taking a lyrical break since the birth of her twins in June, Beyoncé is back – and showing off her Spanish skills – with new material to support hurricane and earthquake relief.

The track is a remix of the J Balvin and Willy William hit song, “Mi Gente," a Spanish title that translates to "My People."

“I am donating my proceeds from this song to hurricane relief charities for Puerto Rico, Mexico, and the other affected Caribbean islands,” the singer wrote today on Instagram. She directed followers to learn more and donate at Beyonce.com/reliefefforts.

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Case Study: Doctor, Patient Break Down Communication Barrier with the Help of Dual-Handset Phone

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on September 26, 2017

Eight percent of all people living in the United States are considered limited English proficient, meaning they speak English less than “very well.”

This language barrier poses challenges in all aspects of life for LEPs, and especially when they visit a physician. One Cantonese patient at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York has been faced with this obstacle again and again as he has dealt with a leg deformity that has required multiple operations to correct.

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By 2055, Asian-Americans Will Be The Nation's Largest Immigrant Group. Is Your Business Ready?

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on September 25, 2017

When we say "Asian-American," we are saying a lot. The U.S. Asian population is a diverse one. A record 20 million Asian-Americans trace their roots to more than 20 countries in East and Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent. Each has a unique history, culture, language, and other characteristics.

Understanding these subtleties is essential to any business that seeks to increase its audience within the U.S. Asian community, which projects to be the nation’s largest immigrant group, surpassing Hispanics by 2055.

Here are five of the most significant findings from a fascinating recent study performed by Pew Research:

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Vital Signs: ASL Interpreters Are A Connection to the Deaf Community That Should Not Be Compromised

Posted by Jorge Ungo on September 22, 2017

It is International Week of the Deaf, a time to raise global awareness about the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing communities.

This is as good a time as any to say the following: If your organization interacts in any way with the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing, and you are relying upon gestures or lip reading to communicate with them, then you are not meeting the needs of a community that is 48 million strong. It’s that simple.

All organizations that interact with the public should be aware of these communities and be prepared to communicate effectively. Here are a few important facts you should know:

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