How to Add An Interpreter to a Zoom Call

Add an interpreter to a zoom meeting

Can I add an on-call interpreter to a Zoom meeting?

During this period of social distancing, remote work, and distance learning, this is the question we’ve heard the most.

The answer is: Yes.

Our new guide shows you how to do it in a few simple steps. Adding an interpreter to these calls can facilitate mutual understanding with limited-English and non-English speakers, as well as the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

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Limited-English Speaking Residents Especially at Risk in Second Wave

Limited English speaking COVID

U.S. residents who don’t speak English are much more likely to test positive for coronavirus, a new study suggests.

Limited-English speaking U.S. residents are nearly five times more likely to become infected with coronavirus. The study from the University of Washington Medicine System also shows that limited-English speakers are less likely to be tested at all.

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This Is an Interpreter

LanguageLine interpretation and translation

There’s a story about the brilliant Renaissance artist Michelangelo. He was asked about the difficulties he must have encountered in sculpting his masterpiece, David. Michelangelo replied with an unassuming description of his creative process:

“It is easy,” he said. “You just chisel away the stone that doesn’t look like David.”

Today is “International Translation/Interpretation Day,” as christened by the United Nations in 1991.

Linguists deserve to be celebrated each day for their heroic work, and especially this day in 2020, a year in which their contributions have meant the difference between life and death.

More than ever, the word “interpreter” is used in our society. The term is often thrown off casually without understanding what a human, professional interpreter actually signifies.

We thought that today would be an opportune time to define “interpreter.”

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The Connection Between Interpreter Quality and Cost

LanguageLine interpreter quality

We talk a great deal about “interpreter quality” and the fact that LanguageLine searches the globe for the finest linguists.

But why does interpreter quality matter? Isn’t great interpreting just a “nice to have” in the grand scheme of things?

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Words Contain Worlds: Saluting Interpreters and Translators

LanguageLine interpretation services

September 30 was christened “International Translation/Interpretation Day” by the United Nations in 1991. Since then, the date has been used to commemorate the role translators and interpreters play in connecting nations, as well as fostering peace, understanding, and development.

For nearly 40 years, we at LanguageLine Solutions have had a front-row seat to witness the miraculous work that linguists do each day. There is quite literally no sector of life that they don’t impact for the better.

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Language-Access Protections Still in Place Despite Rollback on Notices

Language Access

Last week, the Trump Administration announced a rollback of language access notifications for limited-English speakers and other important civil rights protections. The regulations were included in Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act.

Section 1557 is the nondiscrimination provision of the ACA. The law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability in certain health programs or activities, including those that receive federal funding.

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Kiosk Program Provides Limited English Speakers with Virtual Care

Virtual Care Kiosk Program

The rising number of non-English and multi-lingual speakers in California has created significant communication barriers in healthcare settings, resulting in challenges for providers and worse health outcomes for patients.

When patients and clinicians cannot understand each other, the risk of misdiagnosis, under-diagnosis, duplicative testing and inappropriate prescribing increases. Additionally, patients that experience language barriers are less likely to seek care, build trusting relationships with providers, or adhere to treatment programs. 

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REPORT: Hispanics Make Up a Third of All COVID-19 Cases

Hispanics comprise just 18 percent of the U.S. population, yet they make up 33 percent of all COVID-19 cases.

This is according to a report released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It offers a complete picture of who in the United States has been diagnosed with Covid-19 and how they fared.

According to the report, "the coronavirus pandemic continues to be severe, particularly in certain population groups. These preliminary findings underscore the need to build on current efforts to collect and analyze case data, especially among those with underlying health conditions."

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INFOGRAPHIC: The Persistence of Minority Health Disparities

Health crises do not affect everyone equally.

The coronavirus pandemic and recent social unrest have shined a light on the racial and socioeconomic disparities in health and health care in North America. Ethnic minority communities and groups of lower socioeconomic status consistently experience worse health outcomes, and have more difficulty accessing health care and health education.

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Telehealth Services Risk Leaving Non-English Speakers Behind

without language interpreters, telehealth

Telehealth has the potential to improve healthcare access, but without interpreters, it may inadvertently worsen minority health disparities.

A new report from UCLA says that policymakers should ensure that telemedicine doesn’t leave vulnerable populations behind, both during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

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