CASE STUDY: City with 89 Languages Uses Video Interpreting in Community

Mobile Video Interpreting

Bowling Green, KY, is growing increasingly diverse. One local school system says it has registered 89 different languages, with large pockets of Swahili and Burmese.

What can a city do for its schools, first responders, and government agencies when the language mix becomes so complex? An elegant solution has arrived in the form of an on-demand interpreting app that provides one-touch connections to professional linguists.

Bowling Green has embraced this innovative technology. The city is now using on-demand interpreting to assist in communicating with its diverse community.

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Does Your Emergency Action Plan Include the Deaf and Hard of Hearing?

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We are in the midst of the time of year that has come to be known as “hurricane season.” Sadly, it is also a period when we are reminded that the needs of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing are sometimes minimized and even forgotten during an emergency.

Approximately 35 million Americans are hearing impaired. It has been well documented that training designed to help communicate with this community during a disaster is rare and frequently lacks standardization or integration into a formal emergency management plan.

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Prioritizing Interpretation and Translation During Emergency Response

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Language access should be a key component of every disaster plan, especially given the reality that one out of every five U.S. households speaks a language other than English.

One in nine U.S. residents is limited English proficient (LEP), meaning they speak English “less than very well.” In an emergency situation, these individuals are often the most vulnerable.

Unfortunately, caring for the needs of limited English speakers in the face of an emergency is not always the priority it should be. Any individual in an impacted area must have access to disaster information in a language they can understand; if they don’t, the consequences can be deadly.

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Report: Canada Sees Its Biggest Influx of Immigrants in More than 100 Years

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Canada's ambitious immigration plan is creating linguistic changes that are impossible (and irresponsible) to ignore.

A new report says that Canada has experienced its largest inflow of immigrants in more than 100 years.

The country added 71,131 immigrants in October, November, and December 2018. Canada’s full-year immigration increase was 321,065, according to Statistics Canada. The jump is the largest Canada has experienced since 1913 when more than 400,000 immigrants came to the country.

The shift is part of Canada’s goal to admit more than a million new permanent residents by the end of 2021. Under the plan, total immigration is expected to reach 350,000 new permanent residents over the next three years. This would represent an immigration level of nearly 1 percent of Canada’s population, which the nation’s government says must be reached by 2030 to ensure economic growth.

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Which Languages Should Canadian Businesses Target?

LanguageLine Solutions - Which Languages Should Canadian Businesses Target?

Canada’s aggressive immigration initiative is shuffling the country’s language map in a hurry 

Canada is growing increasingly diverse, with its welcoming attitude toward immigrants and goal of admitting more than 1 million new permanent residents by the end of 2021. As CNN reported, “Canada’s friendly stance towards new residents comes as many other Western nations, including the United States, are adopting more restrictive immigration policies.”

“Growing immigration levels … will help us sustain our labor force, support economic growth, and spur innovation,” said Ahmed Hussen, Canada’s Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship.

Canada is a nation of 37 million people, and the initiative is causing a shift in its linguistic landscape.

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LINER NOTES: How Ariana Grande Made the Case for Professional Translation

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LINER NOTES: Improving Depression Care for Multicultural Communities

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Multicultural patients face multiple barriers to receiving care for depression such as scant referral options.

A Virginia-based health center's quality improvement project was able to significantly improve depression care for a vulnerable multicultural population, research shows.

Annual societal costs associated with depression are estimated at $210 billion, and depression is the top cause of disability globally. For minority, immigrant, or refugee patients, cultural factors often impede depression treatment.

"Improving depression screening should lead to measurable outcomes for those who screen positive, including referral to mental health specialists, prescription of appropriate medications, and perhaps most importantly, scheduling of follow-up appointments to monitor signs and symptoms of depression," said Ann Schaeffer of the Harrisonburg Community Health Center.

"There are multiple barriers. These include clinics not prepared with screening tools in multiple languages; providers not culturally aware of the stigma attached to depression; lack of provider confidence in client engagement; and few referral options for multicultural populations."

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LINER NOTES: Why Interpreters ‘Make Really Lousy Spies’

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Two-Way Radio Wrinkle Gives Police Instant Access to Interpreter Services

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Each of us has a resolution for when the calendar turns – a goal to take something old, give it a wrinkle, and make it new again.

The portable two-way radios worn by police officers and other first responders are getting a similar rejuvenation. This new language-access upgrade to an existing technology empowers emergency workers to instantly reach interpreter services when every second counts.

The result is a better outcome for all concerned. Police and community members are able to quickly communicate in a streamlined fashion that saves time and money. Most importantly, the community benefits as officers are able to swiftly harness interpreter services and thus communicate more effectively.

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CASE STUDY: Police Use Video Interpreter App to Communicate

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When it comes to communicating with the police, citizens with hearing difficulty frequently have a hard time feeling heard.

Police Officer Erik Osterkamp of Bellingham, Washington, remembers responding to a car accident where one of the parties was deaf.

“I could tell he was angry,” Osterkamp told Newschannel KIRO-7. “But his ability to communicate and my ability to understand what he was saying—there was a huge gap.”

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