Kiosk Program Provides Limited English Speakers with Virtual Care

Virtual Care Kiosk Program

The rising number of non-English and multi-lingual speakers in California has created significant communication barriers in healthcare settings, resulting in challenges for providers and worse health outcomes for patients.

When patients and clinicians cannot understand each other, the risk of misdiagnosis, under-diagnosis, duplicative testing and inappropriate prescribing increases. Additionally, patients that experience language barriers are less likely to seek care, build trusting relationships with providers, or adhere to treatment programs. 

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Case Study: Translation and Interpretation for Virtual Mental-Health

interpretation translation virtual mental health services

Earlier this year, the government announced $7.5 million in funding to Kids Help Phone, which provides children with mental health support and counseling services during the pandemic crisis.

Kids Help Phone offers 24/7 e-mental health support to all young people across Canada. All of the services are free and confidential.

With support from Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), Kids Help Phone is piloting phone counseling services in Arabic. Sessions are delivered by professional therapists with the assistance of Arabic-speaking interpreters.

In addition to interpretation, LanguageLine also translated information sheets and social images. We also did the Arabic captioning for this video.

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CASE STUDY: Hospital Uses Phone Interpreting to Assist LEP Patients

Hospital Uses Phone Interpreting

Nearly half the residents of Lowndes County, Mississippi, are ethnic minorities, many of whom speak limited English.

For more than a decade, Baptist County Memorial Hospital has used a dual-handset phone to provide language access to patients who are not fluent in English.

Baptist has eight of the phones, which provide round-the-clock connections to LanguageLine’s 10,000-plus professional interpreters. The patient holds one handset, the doctor holds the other, and the language interpreter is remote.

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CASE STUDY: Police Using Video Interpreting with Community Relations

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Suffolk County has an ambitious plan to better relations between the department and the Hispanic community

Of the nearly 1.5 million people living in Suffolk County, New York, nearly 13 percent speak Spanish.

So what do you do if you’re the police chief in a community like this one? If you’re Suffolk Police Chief of Department Stuart Cameron, you learn Spanish.

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CASE STUDY: Police Use Video Interpreter App to Communicate

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When it comes to communicating with the police, citizens with hearing difficulty frequently have a hard time feeling heard.

Police Officer Erik Osterkamp of Bellingham, Washington, remembers responding to a car accident where one of the parties was deaf.

“I could tell he was angry,” Osterkamp told Newschannel KIRO-7. “But his ability to communicate and my ability to understand what he was saying—there was a huge gap.”

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Colorado Medical Center Uses Grant to Purchase Interpreter on Wheels

Yampa Valley Interpreter on Wheels LanguageLine

Yampa Valley Medical Center (YVMC) in Steamboat Springs, CO, is a 39-bed acute-care hospital that provides sophisticated medical services to more than 51,000 outpatients annually. Nestled in the Rocky Mountains, the region is a popular vacation destination, which adds to the challenge of serving the rural area’s diverse language needs.

“We have 16 different languages used in 2017 at the hospital,” said Erica Gallagher, manager of language services at Yampa Valley Medical Center. “Our highest frequency languages are Spanish, Vietnamese, and Mandarin.

“When you first encounter someone that speaks a language other than the one you speak, you may feel like you can communicate decently, and that’s OK. But the more you have experience with it, you come to realize that, even if one word is misinterpreted, the outcome could be fatal or at the very least, have really negative consequences for the patient.”

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