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3 Life-Changing Language Interpretation Calls from the Past Year

Posted by Simon Yoxon-Grant on January 26, 2017



Five hundred twenty-five thousand six hundred minutes. How do we measure a year?

Like “Rent” composer Jonathan Larson, we measure in love, but we also measure in calls.

Over the past 12 months, our team of more than 8,000 professional interpreters has taken more than 32 million calls in more than 240 languages. We have helped more than 25,000 businesses, healthcare organizations, and government agencies make meaningful connections with the people they serve.

Our interpreters are LanguageLine's heartbeat. To remind us all of the impact language services can have, we encourage our interpreters to share their own personal successes and touching moments.

Here are a few of our most memorable language interpretation calls from the past year.

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Part II: 4 More Population Trends Shaping Language Services

Posted by Patti Geye on January 24, 2017

We recently shared some fascinating statistics on the changing faces and languages of the United States.

For instance, it’s no surprise that California and Texas have the largest Hispanic populations, but did you know that North Dakota has the fastest-growing Hispanic population?

In this next post, we’ll explore what other ways our country’s population is shifting and how those changes are impacting the most commonly spoken languages.

Here are four more population trends that may cause you to re-evaluate the language services your organization offers.

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4 Population Trends Shaping Language Services in 2017

Posted by Patti Geye on January 20, 2017

As the great Greek philosopher Heraclitus once said, the only thing that is constant is change. The diverse population of our world and our country is continually shifting, sometimes rapidly and sometimes so slowly it’s imperceptible. 

These population shifts impact the needs of the people you serve, so being aware of them can help you stay prepared.

Here are four population trends you should have on your radar in the coming year and beyond.

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Are You Maximizing Your Investment in Language Services?

Posted by Simon Yoxon-Grant on January 18, 2017

Signing an agreement with a language services provider is a big step toward making your organization more accessible for everyone, but it’s not enough.

Merely having services available will not improve the patient experience or guard against lawsuits unless you are using those services to their full potential and the people you serve know how to access them.

Language access isn’t just a box to be checked; it’s a long-term commitment and an investment. Here are four ways to ensure you get the best return on that investment.

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Please Check In Animals & Alcoholics: 9 Signs Lost in Translation

Posted by Scott Brown on January 13, 2017

Sometimes signs that are meant to direct or clarify only create more confusion. Others make us laugh; still others make us cringe.

The LanguageLine team loves to travel, so we have seen our fair share of perplexing signs.

Here are nine travel-related signs that apparently got lost in translation.

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How to Spot High-Quality Language Interpreters

Posted by Simon Yoxon-Grant on January 6, 2017

Never underestimate the power of a quality language interpreter.

Interpreters bring clarity in the midst of confusion. They diffuse tense situations and even help medical professionals save lives.

The language interpreters your organization uses become your representatives. Ensuring the quality of your interpreters is essential, whether you are training in-house staff or hiring a provider. How can you be sure that you are using a high-quality language interpreter who will represent you well?

We recommend you look for these six indicators:

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5 Elements of an Effective Language Access Plan

Posted by Jorge Ungo on January 4, 2017

At one time, having a language access plan was considered progressive and proactive. Now, it is increasingly becoming a standard for quality care and service.

For instance, health care entities that receive federal funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, HHS-administered programs, and Health Insurance Marketplaces are now required to comply with new federal language access requirements outlined in Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act.

Having a written language access plan brings clarity to these requirements. It articulates unambiguously which members of your staff are responsible for meeting them. A written plan also shows auditors that your organization takes language access seriously so you can continue to maximize your federal funding.

A language access plan should address these five elements.

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Should You Use Phone, Onsite, or Video Remote Interpreting?

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on December 23, 2016

Having more options than at any other time in history is generally a good thing, but the “paradox of choice” has a tendency to paralyze us. (As the famous jam study illustrated, consumers were much more likely to buy a jar of jam when they saw only six options, compared to 24.)

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Three Good Reasons Not to Skimp on Language Services

Posted by Suzanne Franks on December 21, 2016

Bargains can sometimes be deceptive.

You were thrilled to take home a pre-lit Christmas tree you thought was a steal at 80 percent off—until you discovered only 20 percent of it actually lit up.

Or you bought a friend’s used car that seemed perfect for your 16-year-old daughter, only to spend twice the list price on repairs in the first two months.

Buyer’s remorse can also happen when it comes to shopping for language services—and sometimes the results are much worse.

Here are three costly consequences of choosing the lowest-cost language service provider without regard for quality.

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Who Should Lead the Implementation of Your Language Access Plan?

Posted by Jorge Ungo on December 16, 2016

 

Some organizations are just beginning to acknowledge the need for language access services in response to legislation like the Affordable Care Act’s Section 1557, and they don’t know where to start.

Providing meaningful language access to limited English proficiency populations and individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing is not only the right thing to do - it’s required by law.

Someone needs to take ownership of and implement your organization’s language access plan. If you aren’t sure who that "someone" should be, here are a few questions to help you decide.

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