<img src="//bat.bing.com/action/0?ti=5257384&amp;Ver=2" height="0" width="0" style="display:none; visibility: hidden;"> LanguageLine Blog | Video Interpreting


How Does an Interpreter Cope with Difficult Calls? (Video)

Posted by Patti Geye on April 27, 2017

Can you imagine not being able to share very personal thoughts with a loved one, not because you don’t want to, but because you speak different languages? Misunderstanding, frustration, and even sadness can cause problems when you can’t communicate. Professional interpreters are relied on every day to help with difficult experiences like these. They must accurately convey even the most intimate thoughts while remaining impartial.

Interpreters remain objective, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t affected by the situations they interpret.

Meet Christina, a Korean interpreter who tearfully shares the time she helped a patient deliver sad news to her husband. She had to place herself in the middle of a very emotional discussion and remain composed. It left a lasting impression on her.

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'I Am There' - An Interpreter's Story (Video)

Posted by Amy Wade on March 28, 2017

Language interpretation is a difficult profession. Taking call after call without knowing what situation is coming up next requires total concentration and a passion for the profession. At LanguageLine Solutions, we understand that each interpreting session and every person on that call is vitally important. 

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A Mile in Their Shoes

Posted by Patti Geye on August 26, 2016

When deciding which Netflix movie to watch, or fall asleep to in front of the TV, I chose one that seemed fairly entertaining. I settled into my recliner and the movie began. Much to my surprise, it was in Italian with English subtitles. Not speaking Italian, I depend on reading the dialog. I’m pretty good with reading the captions and watching, so ok. About ten minutes in I wasn’t all that impressed. It seemed like they were saying a lot more, with much emotion, but the subtitles were short and fairly impassive. It was an Italian movie, so it was full of feeling. But I just wasn’t “feeling” it.

What was I missing?

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Disruptive Innovation: Change is Scary

Posted by Suzanne Franks on August 17, 2016

Finally, I am binge-watching the last season of the delightful period drama Downton Abbey. As I’ve watched each episode, I am amused with the myriad of “new disruptive innovations” featured in the early 1900s’ drama and the characters’ reactions to them.

There were no less than seven innovations from electricity, to the bicycle, the typewriter, a sewing machine, the telephone, and an automobile featured. Each and every time the new-fangled novelty was met with skepticism. Actually, they were more than skeptical, they were afraid. The innovations challenged their comfort-zone and forced the characters to do things differently or simply be left behind. As Mrs. Patmore, the downstairs cook, exclaimed when she first heard the ringing of the telephone, “Oh my Lord, listen to that! It’s like the cry of the banshee! I wouldn’t touch that thing with a ten foot pole!” Yet with each subsequent episode the disruptive innovation became a way of life. Why? Each new device made their lives easier, more productive and efficient, and more enjoyable. It not only helped make their personal lives easier, it assisted in meeting the demands of the Manor.

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Effective Language Access: The Challenge for Educators

Posted by Greg Holt on August 10, 2016

With the advent of legislation like the Every Student Succeeds Act, No Child Left Behind, and other regulations that strengthen the involvement of parents in their children’s education, school districts have a growing need for successful language access programs.

At the core of the need for language solutions is the principle of ensuring meaningful access to educational programs. Federal legislation, like Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, prohibits discrimination on the basis of national origin, which today includes language. Other statutes touching on equal opportunity for children (and their parents) to participate in the educational process include the Equal Educational Opportunity Act, Title III of No Child Left Behind Act, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Mandates to provide equal access to the benefits of public education are a common theme.

The main driver for the growth of language services in schools is the Limited English Proficient (LEP) population around the country. In the United States, where 1 in 5 individuals now speak a language other than English at home, schools encounter significant language barriers. English language learners (ELL) comprised 9.3% (or 4.5 million students) in 2013-2014. In California that number reached 22.7%! These statistics don’t account for LEP parents. Communicating with parents in their preferred language is critical to their full understanding and participation in their children’s education. 

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Technology's Impact on Interpretation Services

Posted by Scott W. Klein, CEO, LanguageLine Solutions on July 14, 2016

These are exciting times at LanguageLine Solutions! The ability to change the way we do business has been influenced by the incredible speed of technological advancement. New integrated technologies are able to address the growing needs of our clients to communicate with the Limited English Proficient (LEP) and Deaf and Hard of Hearing communities they serve.

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OnSite Interpreters Handle Difficult Health Care Situations

Posted by Kasia Hallman on May 20, 2016

Every interpreting experience is important and has unique requirements and requests. To ensure the very best outcomes, it is imperative that every session is treated with the utmost respect and accuracy. Professional onsite interpreters are mentored to handle situations including sensitive conversations when interpreting between you and your limited English speaking, and Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing patients.

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Bridging Language Barriers in Healthcare Through Education

Posted by Suzy duMont-Perez on July 23, 2015

We all know how difficult it is to make sure everyone is well informed at the office, in a group, even at home. You think you let everyone know, and sure enough someone says, “I didn’t know that,” or “Nobody told me!” So you can imagine how hard it might be to communicate to a large organization.  

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