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What's The Difference Between Language Translation and Interpretation?

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on August 8, 2017

As a language solutions provider, we know clear communication is the first step to understanding. We also know some of the terminology in our industry can be confusing to someone who’s not familiar with it. That’s why we wanted to take a moment to explain the difference between language translation and interpretation, as well as address some other common questions.

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Language Translation Lingo You Need To Know Before Starting A Global Project

Posted by Scott Ludwigsen on June 13, 2017

Every industry has its jargon — terminology that seems like a secret code to outsiders but is used frequently by people within the field. The language industry is no different.

As you begin planning a large language translation project, such as launching a new website to an international audience, it’s helpful to know the terminology so you can be an informed buyer and clearly communicate your needs.

For instance, many people use the terms “interpretation” and “translation” interchangeably when they are two specific services: Interpretation is spoken, while translation refers to the written word.

Here’s a breakdown of some common language translation lingo you’re likely to encounter in a project and how these functions work together to help you reach a global audience.

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How to Plan for a Smooth Website Translation and Localization Project

Posted by Scott Ludwigsen on June 12, 2017

Your website is your welcome mat. But is it truly inviting to all your likely customers, or are language barriers keeping you from reaching an entire population? If you eliminated these language barriers, what would the impact be on your business?

Consider for a moment the fact that more than half the world’s Internet users are in Asia, and there are almost twice as many people online in Europe than in North America, according to Internet World Statistics. With website translation and localization, you can cast a much wider net.

Translation and localization is the process of adapting an existing website to the local language and culture of a target market. It means adapting a website into a different linguistic and cultural context. This is much more complex than simply translating text, as it accounts for cultural differences in distinct markets.

This process is no small undertaking, but once you’ve chosen the right vendor, there are a few important things you can do to plan ahead and make the process easier.

Here are some steps to take before, during, and after your translation and localization project.

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'I Am There' - An Interpreter's Story (Video)

Posted by Amy Wade on March 28, 2017

Language interpretation is a difficult profession. Taking call after call without knowing what situation is coming up next requires total concentration and a passion for the profession. At LanguageLine Solutions, we understand that each interpreting session and every person on that call is vitally important. 

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Know What You’re Getting: Comparing Translation Services

Posted by Scott Ludwigsen on February 2, 2017

The packaging on a Turkish dessert was supposed to promise a treat both delicious and healthy. But a bad translation landed it in the realm of the bizarre and baffling.

It affected as a blood maker, and nutritive forebrain cells,” the packaging said. “It reduce the cronerheart diseases and cancer risk, because containing of E vitamins, unsaturated fat and flovanoids. Its perfect source of energy.”

In a global marketplace, examples abound of translations gone awry — nonsensical, offensive or just subtly … off. You certainly don’t want your product or services to land on that list and turn off potential customers.

There is an abundance of translation services providers who promise to solve this problem – so many that the options can seem overwhelming. Here are four factors to help you compare and contrast your options:

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Please Check In Animals & Alcoholics: 9 Signs Lost in Translation

Posted by Scott Brown on January 13, 2017

Sometimes signs that are meant to direct or clarify only create more confusion. Others make us laugh; still others make us cringe.

The LanguageLine team loves to travel, so we have seen our fair share of perplexing signs.

Here are nine travel-related signs that apparently got lost in translation.

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LanguageLine’s Newest “Language” — Plain English

Posted by Charlene Haykel on October 27, 2016


LanguageLine Solutions has added a “new language” to the more than 240 we already offer our clients. The language is English, with a twist. It’s plain English and it helps you communicate in terms that your reader will readily understand. The benefits include streamlined documents, higher customer satisfaction, lower costs, compliance with regulations, and communications that are better structured for clear translation outcomes. 

Example:
  • Before:
    Your current dividend of $288.55 has purchased paid-up additional insurance in the face amount of $1,249.57. Your total paid-up additional insurance is $2,749.57.

  • After:
    We have bought more life insurance with your dividend: $1,249.57 since your last bill and $2,749.57 since you opened your account.

This example reflects an actual bill that was sent to thousands of clients across the American heartland. Sure, it’s in English but what kind of English? The 23 original words would confound the most fluent native speaker. Written in a more concise, easier to understand format through our new product, LanguageLine® Clarity℠, the revised information has only two fewer words. But they are straight-forward, real words, not acronyms or jargon, and they pack 100% more meaning for the life insurance customer receiving her bill. 



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How Fast Can a Translator Translate if a Translator Translates Fast?

Posted by Zac Westbrook on September 8, 2016

The Need for Speed – Olympics Edition

The Olympics were great, weren’t they? For 3 weeks we watched athletes from all over the world push the limits of what is humanly possible. For many Olympians, such as sprinters, speed is the ultimate goal and they train for thousands of hours and invest countless resources in the hopes of shaving mere milliseconds off their times. In fact, between 1896 and 2012 the world record for the 100 meter dash improved by only 2.37 seconds. That’s right; in 116 years and despite incredible innovation in nutrition, technology, and sports medicine, sprinters only managed to improve their times by an average of two one-hundredths of a second per year.

Don’t get me wrong. The point here is not to malign the best athletes on the planet, but rather to demonstrate that when we’re talking about human endeavor, there are very real physical limitations that constrain what we can do.

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Effective Language Access: The Challenge for Educators

Posted by Greg Holt on August 10, 2016

With the advent of legislation like the Every Student Succeeds Act, No Child Left Behind, and other regulations that strengthen the involvement of parents in their children’s education, school districts have a growing need for successful language access programs.

At the core of the need for language solutions is the principle of ensuring meaningful access to educational programs. Federal legislation, like Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, prohibits discrimination on the basis of national origin, which today includes language. Other statutes touching on equal opportunity for children (and their parents) to participate in the educational process include the Equal Educational Opportunity Act, Title III of No Child Left Behind Act, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Mandates to provide equal access to the benefits of public education are a common theme.

The main driver for the growth of language services in schools is the Limited English Proficient (LEP) population around the country. In the United States, where 1 in 5 individuals now speak a language other than English at home, schools encounter significant language barriers. English language learners (ELL) comprised 9.3% (or 4.5 million students) in 2013-2014. In California that number reached 22.7%! These statistics don’t account for LEP parents. Communicating with parents in their preferred language is critical to their full understanding and participation in their children’s education. 

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Need Help Complying with ACA’s Final Rule?

Posted by Suzy duMont-Perez on July 27, 2016

As a health care provider ensuring access to qualified interpreters for the Limited English Proficient (LEP) and the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing is the right thing to do. Under Section 1557, it is now also the law. 

As of July 18, 2016 health care entities that receive federal funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), HHS-administered programs, and Health Insurance Marketplaces and participating plans are obligated to comply with sweeping new federal language access requirements. These new standards were included in the final rule implementing Section 1557, the nondiscrimination provision of the Affordable Care Act.

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