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Beyond Contact Centers: How to Make Face-to-Face Interactions Your Customer-Service Gold Standard

Posted by Traci Parker on February 8, 2019

It’s no secret that our world is increasingly becoming more digitized. Where we once had customer service agents, we now have apps. Where there were retail outlets, we now have online platforms and overnight delivery. “Bites” have become “bytes,” as even fast food can be ordered with your smartphone.

Some personal interactions remain intact, however. Think of the person who walks into a branch location to set up a utility service or open a bank account. There are also times when utility providers or other service people must come to our homes to check a meter, make a repair, or deliver an item.

Overcoming language barriers during these face-to-face interactions frequently presents a challenge, which often leads to frustration for multicultural customers.

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LINER NOTES: How Ariana Grande Made the Case for Professional Translation

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on February 4, 2019

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LINER NOTES: Four Steps to Improve Depression Care for Multicultural Communities

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on January 28, 2019

Multicultural patients face multiple barriers to receiving care for depression such as scant referral options.

A Virginia-based health center's quality improvement project was able to significantly improve depression care for a vulnerable multicultural population, research shows.

Annual societal costs associated with depression are estimated at $210 billion, and depression is the top cause of disability globally. For minority, immigrant, or refugee patients, cultural factors often impede depression treatment.

"Improving depression screening should lead to measurable outcomes for those who screen positive, including referral to mental health specialists, prescription of appropriate medications, and perhaps most importantly, scheduling of follow-up appointments to monitor signs and symptoms of depression," said Ann Schaeffer of the Harrisonburg Community Health Center.

"There are multiple barriers. These include clinics not prepared with screening tools in multiple languages; providers not culturally aware of the stigma attached to depression; lack of provider confidence in client engagement; and few referral options for multicultural populations."

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LINER NOTES: Harvard Report Says Language, Cultural Competency Are Keys to Competitive Healthcare Market

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on January 22, 2019

The increasingly competitive healthcare market is facing the problem of balancing the need to deliver good clinical outcomes with demands for patient satisfaction. Patients and families are increasingly taking the initiative in steering their healthcare experiences.

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LINER NOTES: Why Interpreters ‘Make Really Lousy Spies’

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on January 14, 2019

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The Great Unbanked: How Language Access Can Help Financial Institutions Reach an Under-Served Market

Posted by David Bethea on October 22, 2018

For a majority of Americans, banking is just a part of life. However, roughly a third of the population has little or no access to a bank, according to the FDIC’s most recent National Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked Households.

That means banks and other financial institutions looking to expand their reach have a tremendous opportunity to do so by reaching this group - provided they use the right approach. Here’s a look at the unique needs of unbanked and underbanked populations and what organizations can do to bridge the gap.

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Declaring Our 'Why'

Posted by Simon Yoxon-Grant on October 16, 2018

Why?

When you do something every day, you tend to lose perspective from time to time. It’s the nature of work that we get so close to what we do that we sometimes forget why we’re doing it.

Three recent news items have refreshed our perspective and reminded us of our “why.” They prompt us to remember that what we do each day is actually pretty remarkable.

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What’s the Difference Between Localization, Internationalization and Globalization?

Posted by Scott Ludwigsen on October 8, 2018

When Procter & Gamble started selling Pampers diapers in Japan, they used the classic image of a stork carrying a baby on the packaging. They later discovered that while the legend of the stork is common in the U.S., Japanese parents tell their children a different tale. Instead of arriving by stork, babies arrive in giant floating peaches.

You might think both legends are equally strange, but the fact is, you’re more likely to purchase a product that fits the narrative you know.

That’s why any brand introducing a new product to a global marketplace needs to consider localization, internationalization and globalization well before the launch.

Let’s take a closer look at the difference between these commonly confused terms and how they work together as part of a well-designed global marketing strategy.

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Open Enrollment is Coming. Here Are Six Things Insurers Can Do to Improve Communication with Non-English Speakers

Posted by Cory Markert on September 19, 2018

Healthcare Open Enrollment Period is coming soon. Starting Nov. 1, plans participating in the Health Insurance Marketplace will be flooded with inquiries. Agents are no doubt readying themselves for questions in every shape and form. 

But are they prepared to field these same questions in a variety of languages?

This is an altogether different matter – one that has a great deal to do with providing an ideal customer experience and reaching a previously underserved market.

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Why Pharmacies Need Language Access

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on September 18, 2018

Like physicians, pharmacies play an important role in empowering patients to take charge of their health

Unfortunately, language barriers often make it more difficult for non-English-speaking customers to ask important questions about their medication, take it as directed, and be aware of potential side effects.

As pharmacies serve increasingly diverse populations, language access is becoming more important than ever.

The Center for Immigration Studies reports that one in five Americans (65 million people) speaks a language other than English at home. Just over of 40 percent of these individuals is considered Limited English Proficient (LEP), meaning they speak English “less than very well” and are entitled to assistance. This LEP group constitutes about nine percent of the total U.S. population.

Language barriers can pose serious health risks to LEP customers. Research has shown that those with little knowledge of English often do not have a good understanding of their medication instructions.

Here are a few ways language access can help pharmacists empower their customers.

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