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LINER NOTES: What Is the Most Common Language in Your State (Besides English or Spanish)?

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on June 17, 2019

Each week, LanguageLine selects and excerpts five stories about language and culture that we think readers will find intriguing. Here is this week’s “Liner Notes”:

Americans speak more than 300 languages. A new map shows which languages other than English and Spanish are the most common in each state and Washington, D.C.

The United States Census Bureau's American Community Survey annually asks more than 1 million Americans questions about their lives, families, and backgrounds. One question asks respondents what language they mainly speak in their homes.

English is, unsurprisingly, the most commonly spoken language across the U.S., and Spanish is second most common in 46 states and the District of Columbia. Business Insider excluded those two languages in the above map, which depicts the next-most-frequently spoken languages at home in each state.

The map shows a wide variety of languages. German is the most commonly spoken non-English, non-Spanish language in nine states, with French most common in six states and D.C. Vietnamese was the most common language in six states.

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Report: Census Could Lead to Worst Latinx Undercount in 30 Years

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on June 10, 2019

Each week, LanguageLine selects and excerpts five stories about language and culture that we think readers will find intriguing. Here is this week’s “Liner Notes”:

Challenges threatening the upcoming 2020 census could put more than 4 million people at risk of being undercounted in next year's national head count, according to new projections by the Urban Institute.

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LINER NOTES: What Will America Look Like in 2040?

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on June 3, 2019

Each week, LanguageLine selects five stories about language and culture that we think readers will find intriguing. Here is this week’s “Liner Notes”:

By the time today’s teenagers hit their 30s, there will be more minorities than whites living in the United States, according to a statistical compilation published by Axios.

According to the report, the demographic shifts we have seen will achieve a tipping point in the 2040s, at which point the country will be older than it is today, as well as “majority minority.”

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NEW eBOOK: Video Interpreting for Children's Hospitals

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on May 23, 2019

When it comes to communication between children, their families, and pediatric healthcare providers, it’s critical that everyone understands each other.

Add in a language barrier, and this understanding becomes all the more challenging.

In our new case study, "Video Interpreting for Children's Hospitals: Best Practices When Caring for Pediatric Patients," we discuss how some of the nation’s top children’s hospitals are using video remote interpreting to improve communication, productivity, and patient outcomes.

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Language Barriers and Health Disparities – An Interview with LanguageLine CEO Scott W. Klein

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on May 15, 2019

LanguageLine Solutions President and CEO Scott W. Klein recently sat down for a just-published interview with Authority Magazine in which the future of health care in North America was discussed, in particular as it applies to limited-English speakers.

Asked what changes need to be made to improve the overall U.S. healthcare system, he responded:

“We see healthcare issues through the lens of language,” Klein said. “To us, it’s not shocking that there are massive health disparities for minorities living in the U.S. For example, it’s astounding that 45 percent of Hispanic boys and 53 percent of Hispanic girls living in the U.S. are predicted to develop diabetes in their lifetimes. In general, ethnic minorities here are twice as likely to develop a chronic disease compared to their non-Hispanic white counterparts.

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INFOGRAPHIC: How Banks, Lenders, and Other Financial Institutions Can Reach Multicultural Consumers

Posted by Kathy Peters on May 2, 2019

Limited English speakers have historically found it difficult to access financial products and services.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau indicates many of the challenges they encounter are related to language access and financial literacy.

Banks, lenders, and other institutions ignore this audience at their own peril. The potential for new revenue among multicultural consumers is significant. On average, this diverse market is younger and growing faster than the general market, which suggests growth potential for the future.

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LINER NOTES: America’s Majority Minority Future

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on April 29, 2019

By 2045, the United States as a whole is projected to become majority minority.

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Changing Language Service Providers? How to Pick the Right Alternative

Posted by Lulu Sanchez on April 24, 2019

The bad news is your language service provider isn’t right for you anymore.

Now the good news: You have an opportunity to start fresh with a new provider. And, if you do it right, you can make the switch seamlessly, without impacting the individuals you serve or inconveniencing your staff. Before making the switch, here are five steps you should take to ensure you select and transition to the right provider.

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LINER NOTES: The Hispanic Vote Will Be Critical in 2020. So Why Are Candidates Fumbling Spanish Translation?

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on April 15, 2019

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LINER NOTES: How Shows Like Game of Thrones and Star Trek Create New Languages

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on April 9, 2019

Each week, LanguageLine selects five stories about language and culture that we think readers will find intriguing. Here is this week’s “Liner Notes”:

Time was, if you were creating a fantasy or sci-fi world in film or TV, you could simply make up some lines using sounds that English speakers didn’t hear much and get away with few people noticing or caring.

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