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NEW EBOOK: Five Criteria You Need To Know When Evaluating Interpreting Agencies

Posted by Phil Speciale on October 7, 2019

More than ever before, language services providers (LSPs) are essential partners in managing and growing modern organizations that welcome all people, regardless of language, culture, or ability.

Here’s why:

One in five U.S. households speaks a language other than English at home. That’s more than 65 million people. Another 10 million are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. There are more than 350 languages currently spoken in the U.S.

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INFOGRAPHIC: America Is Entering an Era of Unprecedented Diversity

Posted by Scott Brown on October 3, 2019

An immigration wave is coming.

Did you know that over the next four decades, almost 90 percent of U.S. population growth will come from immigration?

Or that nearly half of these individuals are expected to lack English proficiency? 

How do declining American birth rates factor into this shift? Where will these immigrants come from, and how will this change the face of the America we know today?

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Why Interpreter Recruiting Matters When Comparing Language Services Providers

Posted by Kathy Peters on October 2, 2019

Interpreter quality is the lifeblood of on-demand interpreting.

Connect times and technological bells and whistles do not matter if the interpreter on the other end of the line is not fully capable of delivering the empowerment you desire. It is imperative that language services providers (LSPs) have a sophisticated method for recruiting the finest interpreters in the world to meet your needs.

When evaluating interpreter quality, it is helpful to break the subject into four sections:

  1. Interpreter recruiting
  2. Interpreter new hire training
  3. Quality assurance, monitoring, and ongoing development and support
  4. Procedures and policies to ensure safety and security of information

In this article, we will address interpreter recruiting. Future blogs will cover the other criteria above.

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WEBINAR: Do Healthcare Providers Fully Understand Their Responsibilities to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing?

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on October 1, 2019

Hospitals and other healthcare organizations frequently grapple with understanding and fulfilling their communication responsibilities to patients who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

To help healthcare organizations achieve compliance, we are offering a webinar titled “Healthcare Providers: Understanding Communication Responsibilities to Patients Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.”

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How to Evaluate the Reliability of a Language Services Provider

Posted by Todd Sanislow on September 12, 2019

If language isn’t on your mind when thinking about the future of your organization, it should be. Finding a reliable language services provider is critical to the success of your organization.

Consider this: More than 65 million U.S. residents speak a language other than English at home. Another 10 million are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. The complexity of communicating with these individuals will only increase, given that immigration is expected to account for nearly 90 percent of population growth in the U.S. over the next 40 years.

Believe it or not, the linguistic and cultural hurdles you may be facing can be turned into enormous opportunities. To accomplish this, you’ll want to partner with a language services provider that has the interpretation and translation solutions necessary to take on these challenges with ease.

When trying to decide which language services provider (LSP) is right for you, the first thing to know is that not all LSPs are created equal. Much like companies within your industry, some players in the language services space are more formidable than others.

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Why Being Bilingual Does Not Necessarily Make You an Interpreter

Posted by Ana Catalina Arguedas Fernandez on September 10, 2019

Learning a second language is hard work.

Bilingualism brings with it a level of language proficiency that is sufficient for most standard, everyday situations and conversations.

Unfortunately, many organizations feel they have their language needs covered because they have a bilingual person on staff. This is typically not the case for several reasons.

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INFOGRAPHIC: A Checklist to Help You Evaluate Language Services Providers

Posted by Scott Brown on September 5, 2019

Today in the United States, one out of every five of our neighbors speaks a language other than English at home—that’s more than 64 million people. Another 10 million are Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

Many struggle to communicate as they navigate their everyday lives. A doctor’s visit, a traffic stop, a parent-teacher conference, or a trip to the bank—things we take for granted—can be very difficult for these individuals. As most of us would, they may feel embarrassed, frustrated, or excluded.

Whereas this lack of understanding is distressing, the experience of being understood is empowering. Language access can be far more than transactional—the mere exchanging of words, much as one would exchange one currency for another. When done right, language access is transformational. Believe it or not, the language and cultural hurdles you’re facing today can be turned into enormous opportunities.

For this to happen, you’ll need a partner that can take these challenges and help you manage them with ease. Language services providers (LSPs) provide the interpretation and translation services you’ll need. But which LSP is right for your organization?

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Do You Fully Understand Your Agency's ADA Responsibilities to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing?

Posted by Greg Holt on September 4, 2019

Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act covers a lot of terrain. Many public agencies lack a specific understanding of their communication responsibilities to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing under Title II.

September is officially Deaf Awareness Month. In recognition, we are hosting an upcoming webinar called “ADA Title II: Understanding the Communication Responsibilities of State and Local Agencies.” During this webinar, leading ADA and disabilities rights expert Julia Sain will outline requirements for state and local government agencies when communicating with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing communities they serve. She will also address attendee questions.

In particular, this webinar will be essential listening for state and local government officials who are responsible for language access and compliance. Non-profit organizations that work with local government agencies to provide services will also find it of great interest.

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What Languages Will Your Customers Speak in 10 Years?

Posted by Greg Marshall on September 3, 2019

If you think it’s difficult to define your typical customer today, imagine what it will be like in a decade.

For one thing, by 2030, the concept of one particular racial or ethnic group being in the majority will be fading fast and will be non-existent by 2043, according to U.S. Census data. Your customers may be just as likely to speak Spanish at home as they are to speak English. And although they may be able to speak English, many will feel more comfortable having conversations in another language.

If you want your company to continue providing exceptional customer service and maintaining a competitive advantage, you need to be prepared to welcome anyone who walks in the door.

What will be the most common languages in the United States in the future? While no one knows for sure, we can get some good indicators by looking at a few key trends.

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The Six Medical Documents That Absolutely, Positively Must Be Translated

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on August 19, 2019

As a healthcare provider, the patient is always your main concern. Of course, the care you provide is also guided by laws and regulations.

While some of these laws and regulations can make the jobs of doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other providers more complicated, we can all agree that the majority of them help ensure that patients and health care professionals are protected and everyone can access the same high-quality medical care when it’s needed.

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