<img src="//bat.bing.com/action/0?ti=5257384&amp;Ver=2" height="0" width="0" style="display:none; visibility: hidden;"> LanguageLine Blog | Health care

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CASE STUDY: How Regional Hospitals in the South Are Using Video Remote Interpreting to Communicate with Multicultural Patients

Posted by Julie Carson on May 8, 2019

Like most places in the United States, Spartanburg, South Carolina, is growing more diverse.

More than 6 percent of those living in the regions served by the Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System do not speak English, and nearly 4 percent of the area’s residents were born outside the United States.

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WEBINAR: Video Interpreting for Pediatric Patients: Best Practices When Caring for Children

Posted by Mary Keogh on March 11, 2019

Representatives from three of the nation's leading pediatric hospitals will share their insights into successfully implementing VRI

Communication in a medical setting can be a challenge when both patient and provider speak the same language – but it's even tougher when they don’t.

This challenge is especially pronounced when it comes to treating children who are limited English-speaking, deaf, or hard-of-hearing.

With nearly 9 percent of the U.S. population considered limited English proficient, thousands of healthcare organizations have successfully implemented language access programs to ensure effective communication for their adult patients. But far fewer organizations have a solid understanding of best practices when working with pediatric patients and family members who require language assistance.

Video remote interpreting (VRI) is shifting this dynamic.

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LINER NOTES: Should Students Use Netflix to Learn a Foreign Language?

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on March 6, 2019

Each week, LanguageLine selects five stories about language and culture that we think readers will find interesting, as they could have far-reaching implications.

We wrote earlier this week about how America’s failure to fund language education is creating a national security crisis. Reports suggest that fewer school-age kids in English-speaking countries are picking up a second or foreign language. This is an alarming trend as it makes students less competitive, in addition to leaving them with a smaller arsenal of the skills needed to thrive in an increasingly globalized and multicultural world.

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Measuring the ROI of Language Services in Health Care

Posted by Matthew Riley on February 28, 2019

Quick and accurate communication is imperative in hospital settings.

A Somali man rushes into the emergency room with his young son, who has fallen from the balcony of their second-story apartment. Although the boy has no visible injuries, his father is concerned he may have a concussion and internal bleeding. He tries frantically to communicate with emergency room personnel using gestures and the few English phrases he has learned since moving to the United States six months earlier.

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Best Practices for Healthcare Translations

Posted by Cory Markert on February 19, 2019

The importance of providing translated materials to multicultural patients cannot be overemphasized.

Unfortunately, many healthcare organizations are not sure how to expand their language access programs to include healthcare translation services.

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Does Your Staff Need Medical Interpreter Certification?

Posted by Ana Catalina Gonzalez Siax on February 15, 2019

When it comes to health care, quality medical interpreting can have a profound impact on patient outcomes.

Using professional interpreters reduces the risk to patients and enhances their health literacy, which in turn empowers patients to be proactive and experience better outcomes. Medical interpreting is a specialization with the field, as it requires a command of terminology and concepts.

A 2015 study in the journal Medical Care assessed the accuracy of medical interpretation during 32 primary care visits and found errors were twice as likely to occur when physicians used untrained interpreters compared to professional interpreters.

Nearly 7 percent of those errors could have had significant medical consequences, such as giving an incorrect drug dosage or inaccurately describing the patient’s symptoms.

By using medical interpreter certification as a standard process to qualify interpreters,  you can ensure you’re providing meaningful language access for your patients. This enables your organization to comply with federal laws while also improving patient experience and outcomes. Additionally, it allows your organization to justify pay increases to bilingual employees and improves their own professional development.

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LINER NOTES: How Ariana Grande Made the Case for Professional Translation

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on February 4, 2019

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LINER NOTES: Four Steps to Improve Depression Care for Multicultural Communities

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on January 28, 2019

Multicultural patients face multiple barriers to receiving care for depression such as scant referral options.

A Virginia-based health center's quality improvement project was able to significantly improve depression care for a vulnerable multicultural population, research shows.

Annual societal costs associated with depression are estimated at $210 billion, and depression is the top cause of disability globally. For minority, immigrant, or refugee patients, cultural factors often impede depression treatment.

"Improving depression screening should lead to measurable outcomes for those who screen positive, including referral to mental health specialists, prescription of appropriate medications, and perhaps most importantly, scheduling of follow-up appointments to monitor signs and symptoms of depression," said Ann Schaeffer of the Harrisonburg Community Health Center.

"There are multiple barriers. These include clinics not prepared with screening tools in multiple languages; providers not culturally aware of the stigma attached to depression; lack of provider confidence in client engagement; and few referral options for multicultural populations."

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Correcting Three Misconceptions About The 2019 CMS Call Center Monitoring Study

Posted by Mike McMahon on January 23, 2019

Each year, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) conduct a Call Center Monitoring Study.

CMS performs the study between February and June by placing calls to Medicare Part C and D call centers to - among other thing - evaluate performance in assisting Limited English Proficient (LEP) and Deaf and Hard of Hearing callers.

A portion of the study measures the availability of an interpreter, as well as the accuracy of information provided by the customer-service agent. This portion is called the Accuracy and Accessibility Study.

There are massive financial and marketing implications to the CMS study, as plans earning four and five stars stand to net additional dollars in Quality Bonus Payments, as well as valuable opportunities to shop their plans. (Five-star plans are afforded the opportunity to enroll members throughout the year.)

Given these high stakes, it’s only natural that misconceptions would emerge as plans aim for the highest score possible.

Below are three misconceptions that we hear most often. We’ve researched each of these suppositions and are glad to explain the reality behind each of them.

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LINER NOTES: Harvard Report Says Language, Cultural Competency Are Keys to Competitive Healthcare Market

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on January 22, 2019

The increasingly competitive healthcare market is facing the problem of balancing the need to deliver good clinical outcomes with demands for patient satisfaction. Patients and families are increasingly taking the initiative in steering their healthcare experiences.

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