<img src="//bat.bing.com/action/0?ti=5257384&amp;Ver=2" height="0" width="0" style="display:none; visibility: hidden;"> LanguageLine Blog | Government


Does Your Interpreter Training Program Have These Essentials?

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on February 23, 2018

Whether you have bilingual employees or use interpreters in your contact center, they are an extension of your organization—for better or for worse.

How confident are you that they are communicating clearly to your customers?

There are only two ways to know for sure: Be fluent in multiple languages yourself, or ensure your in-house interpreters have been tested and properly trained.

Whether you have an interpreter training program in place now or are looking to implement one, be sure it includes these five essential elements.

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Could Your Organization Benefit from Video Remote Interpreting? Ask Yourself These Questions.

Posted by The LanguageLine Solutions Team on August 2, 2017

One in five of our neighbors here in the United States speak a language other than English at home. That’s more than 61 million people – 25 million of whom say they speak English less than well. Another 28 million Americans are deaf or hard of hearing.

The influence of these diverse audiences is enormous and growing. They are citizens, patients, and consumers. Meeting them in their preferred language builds loyalty, achieves compliance, and increases staff productivity while reducing expenses. The opportunities are clear, but the challenge is that – with hundreds of languages spoken in America today – it is very difficult for any organization to meet this demand.

Video remote interpreting (VRI) is an on-demand platform that provides communication to limited English proficient, deaf, or hard-of-hearing individuals by connecting to a professional interpreter in an offsite location. This is done via camera and microphone on a tablet, smart phone, or desktop, using an Internet or cellular connection. VRI reduces the risk of misunderstanding by capturing body language and facial expressions to read visual cues.

Before implementing VRI, your organization should discuss the needs of your audience and how video will fit into your language access plan. Take the time to have this discussion with your front-line staff and any other key stakeholders. Here are a few questions to prompt discussion:

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Infographic: How Language Access Helps Government Agencies Build Public Trust

Posted by Greg Holt on June 15, 2017

Government agencies must overcome language barriers to improve public service and build stronger relationships with their communities.

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Three Metrics to Determine the ROI of Language Access for Government

Posted by Greg Holt on May 19, 2017

Government agencies face enormous challenges.

A growing list of regulations and unfunded mandates have put a strain on already-tight budgets. Maintaining employee morale and retention while serving an increasingly diverse population with high expectations—amid growing public scrutiny—only adds to the pressure.

Improving communication and the overall customer experience is central to overcoming these challenges, and language services are an important component of achieving this. But without meaningful metrics, agencies have a hard time assessing their progress.

Here are three service-related metrics all government agencies should track as they strive to create a better experience for everyone they serve.

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Effective Language Access: The Challenge for Educators

Posted by Greg Holt on August 10, 2016

With the advent of legislation like the Every Student Succeeds Act, No Child Left Behind, and other regulations that strengthen the involvement of parents in their children’s education, school districts have a growing need for successful language access programs.

At the core of the need for language solutions is the principle of ensuring meaningful access to educational programs. Federal legislation, like Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, prohibits discrimination on the basis of national origin, which today includes language. Other statutes touching on equal opportunity for children (and their parents) to participate in the educational process include the Equal Educational Opportunity Act, Title III of No Child Left Behind Act, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Mandates to provide equal access to the benefits of public education are a common theme.

The main driver for the growth of language services in schools is the Limited English Proficient (LEP) population around the country. In the United States, where 1 in 5 individuals now speak a language other than English at home, schools encounter significant language barriers. English language learners (ELL) comprised 9.3% (or 4.5 million students) in 2013-2014. In California that number reached 22.7%! These statistics don’t account for LEP parents. Communicating with parents in their preferred language is critical to their full understanding and participation in their children’s education. 

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Translation Services: It’s the Law, and It’s a Good Thing!

Posted by Jon Bove on February 11, 2016

“It's one thing to have a language access mandate and even a language access policy; it's another thing to put these mandates and policies into place.” Language Access Coordinator for a Large U.S. City

Government organizations have instituted language access plans and policies to provide meaningful access to services in the most common local languages. But, unfortunately, plans don’t always equal results and limited English proficient (LEP) communities often do not receive that much-needed in information in their own language.

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